Lanceuse, 2017

Lanceuse, 2017
sheet metal
80 x 105 cm
Lanceur B, 2017

Lanceur B, 2017
sheet metal
Camp, 2017

Camp, 2017
Installation made of corrugated metal and mirrors
16 meters
Spiral Large, 2017

Spiral Large, 2017
barbed wires
230 x 100 cm
Arbre 3, 2017

Arbre 3, 2017
barbed wire and olive wood
110 x 110 x 110 cm
Arbre 5, 2017

Arbre 5, 2017
barbed wire and olive wood
120 x 110 x 85 cm
Arbre 6, 2017

Arbre 6, 2017
barbed wire and olive wood
105 x 85 x 100 cm
Circle, 2017

Circle, 2017
Barbed wires
80 x 80 cm
Spirale ( format horizontal), 2017

Spirale ( format horizontal), 2017
ink and pencil on paper
30 x 42 cm
Frame: 35 x 49 cm
Maison des pigeons, 2017

Maison des pigeons, 2017
ink and pencil on paper
30 x 42 cm
Frame: 35 x 49 cm
Métier à tisser, 2017

Métier à tisser, 2017
ink and pencil on paper
30 x 42 cm
Frame: 35 x 49 cm
Sans Titre, 2017

Sans Titre, 2017
ink and pencil on paper
30 x 42 cm
Frame: 35 x 49 cm
Spirale ( vertical), 2017

Spirale ( vertical), 2017
ink and pencil on paper
30 x 42 cm
Frame: 35 x 49 cm

Abdul Rahman Katanani, Stone thrower, corugated and barbed wire

Abdul Rahman Katanani, Spiral, barbed wire

Abdul Rahman Katanani, Spiral (detail), barbed wire

Abdul Rahman Katanani, barbed wire

Abdul Rahman Katanani, barbed wire. Work in progress at the Vents des Firets art centera

Abdul Rahman Katanani, barbed wire. Work in progress at the Vents des Firets art centera

Abdul Rahman Katanani, barbed wire. Work in progress at the Vents des Firets art centera

Abdul Rahman Katanani, in his early thirties, is a visual artist originating from Palestine. He was born in the Sabra during the Lebanese civil war. He spent most of his years in Sabra, a refugee camp in the western suburbs of Beirut. The camp is his biotope, his natural element. He lived there and he created his art there, making exhibitions for those who lived there like him. Known at first as an artist from the streets and a caricaturist, Katanani soon chose sculpture as his mean of expression. His achievements are marked by the use of recycled materials such as corrugated iron, barbed wire and other containers. They evoke poverty, territorial confinement, coercion and freedom. They appears as the consistent result of a “being-given” state of the world. By articulating everything together, the artist focuses on the weight of the world, the lives of refugees in Lebanon, to the status of stateless people. Katanani deals with this “weight of the world” mentionned by writer Peter Handke, the gravity of life circumstances.

 

Paul Ardenne

For more information about the artist and available works, please Click here