Crashed airplane, 2008

Crashed airplane, 2008
On the quiet water
Inkjet on Fine Art paper
60 x 170 cm
Forbidden city, 2007

Forbidden city, 2007
Phantom Landscape III
Inkjet on Fine Art paper
52 x 260 cm
Greece 1, 2010

Greece 1, 2010
Greece
Ultragiclee print on Traditional Photo Paper
70 x 64 cm
Bowl of Taipei #1, 2013

Bowl of Taipei #1, 2013
Bowl of Taipei
Inkjet on Fine Art paper
100 x 100 cm
Bowl of Taipei #5, 2013

Bowl of Taipei #5, 2013
Bowl of Taipei
Inkjet on Fine Art paper
100 x 100 cm
Bowl of Taipei #3, 2013

Bowl of Taipei #3, 2013
Bowl of Taipei
Inkjet on Fine Art paper
100 x 100 cm
A Cloud On The Horizon , 2008

A Cloud On The Horizon , 2008
Heavenly City
Inkjet on Fine Art paper
150 x 164 cm
A snake and a grenade, 2012

A snake and a grenade, 2012
Silent valley
Inkjet print on fine art paper
A scorpion and missile, 2012

A scorpion and missile, 2012
Silent valley
Inkjet print on fine art paper
66 x 118 cm
Waning crescent moon , 2012

Waning crescent moon , 2012
Moonlight
Epson UltraGiclee print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag Baryta Fineart
90 x 90 cm
The Moonlight - Full moon, 2012

The Moonlight - Full moon, 2012
The Moonlight
Inkjet print on fine art paper
140x140cm
Outside 7, 2006

Outside 7, 2006
Outside
Inkjet on Fine Art paper
50 x 50 cm
Outside 5, 2006

Outside 5, 2006
Outside
Inkjet on Fine Art paper
50 x 50 cm

Yang Yongliang, born in 1980, lives and works at Shanghai. He depends heavily on his a camera and a laptop computer to make his art. Using these tools, Yang established a connection between traditional art and the contemporary art.


Indeed, he learned traditional Chinese art and culture during his childhood, which has influenced his art. He combines ancient Chinese art techniques, such as shui mo painting and calligraphy, with photographic elements of modern urban Shanghai, arranged in the traditional composition of Chinese landscape, to produce artworks with a perfect balance between fragility and danger, beauty and cruelty. He?s among a generation of young artists who came of age after the Chinese Cultural Revolution, and therefore embraces a level of artistic freedom.


Yang Yongliang invents urban scenes that depict skyscrapers under construction, freeway systems, electrical power plants, and bustling urban corridors. His compositions starkly reveal the impacts of technological progress that China has undergone over past decades.
Yang Yongliang?s work has been exhibited at Moscow Biennale, Ullens Center for Contemporary Art and National Gallery of Victoria among others and is collected by public institutes such as the British Museum and the Metropolitan Museum of Art.



For more information about the artist and available works, please Click here